Haitian Vodou is a henotheistic religion, although viewed by many Haitians as a cultural practice, widely practiced in the country of Haiti. An extremely important aspect of the performance of this music is the Kasé (from the French Casser, to break). Gède - The loas of this nanchon are the spirits eroticism and death.

Ellipsis Arts, 1997. "HAITI VODOU: THE VOODOO DRUMS OF HAITI" Various Artists (Red Eye Music 2010) [1] The lowest of the three Rada drums, the Katabou plays a similar role to the Boula of Port-au-Prince Rada music; beating the second and third triplet notes (the off-beats) of each underlying pulse. A good example of this is found in the Mahi rhythm - Mahi Darielle, Mahi Japeté and Mahi Deté are all variations of Mahi Simp (from the French Simple). Over time, they disguised their belief in many gods or spirits by assigning Catholic saint names to each one of them, so they could tell their handlers that they were venerating saints. sound.

The word Chwal (from the French cheval) is used to describe one who is "being ridden". The Ayibobo 1 album encapsulates a tranche of the "Kanzo Rite" from Hountor, Gran Chemin, Legba, Marasa, Loko, Ayizan, to Danbalah in its initial order. This ensemble consists of a family of three drums - The Manman, Segon and Boula - and one bell called Ogan.

Arts, 1997. While the tone is very tricky to learn, it is even harder to do in the rapid succession which is required for some rhythms.

Vodou as practiced in urban centres in Haiti and some cities in North America (especially New Orleans) is a ritualistic faith system that involves ceremonies that consist of singing, drumming and dancing. Counterhoops for the skins are made from lianas or stiff vines. 3:49. vodou ceremony *An excellent resource on the Internet for exploring many aspects of Haitian Vodou including drum music with audio samples can be found at: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Delphi/5319/ayibobo.htm**Angels in the Mirror: Vodou Music of Haiti (Ellipsis Arts) - For a clear example of the difference between Port-au-Prince and Gonaives Rada music, consult tracks 2 and 3.

As such, before one can come to play, appreciate, and understand this music one should view it in its religious context. Connect your Spotify account to your Last.fm account and scrobble everything you listen to, from any Spotify app on any device or platform.

A good example of this is found in the Mahi rhythm - Mahi Darielle, Mahi Japeté and Mahi Deté are all variations of Mahi Simp (from the French Simple). Some people place Djouba under the Petwo Branch, and some others consider the Kongo branch its own entity. In each of these Vodou Lakou, the ritual prayer language, drums, songs, rhythms and dances all distinctly unique, and are direct descendants of the ancestral and spiritual line to which that particular Lakou is dedicated.